A Fatal Grace (Penny)

Although she announces the victim in the first sentence of the book, for about 50 pages or so, I actually hoped that this wasn’t a mystery. Penny has, once again, created such a dynamic range of people, so fully human, that I just wanted her to tell the story of these people and their village of Three Pines. These characters are flawed and funny and so relentlessly decent that I was genuinely moved by their interactions.But then the promised murder happens, and there’s another dead body.

But then the promised murder happens, and there’s another dead body. That the two were related did not surprise me. That Penny still resorts to the mystery author’s trick of suddenly and unrealistically concealing a detail still nagged at me. But these minor annoyances were easily displaced by the magic of Three Pines and its inhabitants. Once again, we have a creative murder and the dogged persistence of the thoughtful Inspector Gamache, who now has his own problems to address, not at home, but at work. Perhaps buoyed by the success of her first novel, Penny is clearly planning ahead here. I, for one, look forward to following along. The Cruelest Month is next.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s